• Native American Farming (Influenced 75% of the World's Food Supply)

    Native Americans helped the colonists survive in their new environment. They gave the colonists new crops such as squash and maize, and taught them farming methods. Native Americans also taught the colonists a crop rotation system, which helped to preserve soil nutrients. The Native Americans had a wonderful knowledge of the natural materials in the world around them. They were able to teach the settlers about food, medicine and dyes. This information was very important to the colonists and they learned how to become farmers. Another method used by the Native American was a technique in which rows of crops were placed closely to one another. In between the first set of crops another set would be placed. This was an efficient method saving space and making the most out of the land. The t...

    published: 25 Feb 2011
  • Permaculture is like Native American agriculture

    http://www.permies.com Heidi Bohan, author of "The People of Cascadia" talks about the Native American agriculture in the pacific northwest hundreds of years ago. She explains that the native american people that were here then were well beyond "hunter gatherer". They had an agriculture all their own. Much like permaculture. I think that this Native American idea of agriculture is far beyond current agriculture practices. Even beyond organic agriculture practices. The Native Americans used polyculture techniques and focused on plants reproducing themselves. Enhancing natural systems. Heidi mentions that the Native Americans would do burnings to help with production. Including to keep trees out of certain agrculture fields. You can learn more about Heidi and her book at...

    published: 08 Feb 2011
  • Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24

    In which John Green teaches you about the Wild, Wild, West, which as it turns out, wasn't as wild as it seemed in the movies. When we think of the western expansion of the United States in the 19th century, we're conditioned to imagine the loner. The self-reliant, unattached cowpoke roaming the prairie in search of wandering calves, or the half-addled prospector who has broken from reality thanks to the solitude of his single-minded quest for gold dust. While there may be a grain of truth to these classic Hollywood stereotypes, it isn't a very big grain of truth. Many of the pioneers who settled the west were family groups. Many were immigrants. Many were major corporations. The big losers in the westward migration were Native Americans, who were killed or moved onto reservations. Not cool...

    published: 09 Aug 2013
  • Agritourism: Every Field has a Story | Katharine Millonzi | TEDxHudson

    This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Awarded a Fulbright to eat, drink, and study her way through Italy, Millonzi discovers new ways for American Agricultural enterprises to enliven and sustain their unique position in the creative and hospitality economies. An ethno-botanist and gastronome, Katharine Millonzi has worked with agriculturalists and policymakers in Kenya, India, Brazil, the Balkans, and across Europe, exploring the relationship between culture and food. Previously, she directed the Sustainable Food and Agriculture Program at Williams College, was head of staff at the New Economics Institute, and has consulted for a wide range of food-craft enterprises in New England. Millonzi was a 2007 Fulbright Fellow in Italy, where sh...

    published: 03 Nov 2014
  • Native American Culture (8-1.1)

    This video is aligned with 8th Grade South Carolina Social Studies Standards. Find more videos like this at www.scssvideos.com

    published: 26 Aug 2017
  • Montana Rancher Feature: Karen Yost on the American Agri-Women

    Why do we need to tell the agriculture story? In this video, native Montanan, Karen Yost, shares her perspective on that topic and how one group of women is coming together to be a unified voice for agriculture.

    published: 17 Jan 2014
  • The Agricultural Revolution: Crash Course World History #1

    Crash Course World History is now available on DVD! Visit http://store.dftba.com/products/crashcourse-world-history-the-complete-series-dvd-set to buy a set for your home or classroom. You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green investigates the dawn of human civilization. John looks into how people gave up hunting and gathering to become agriculturalists, and how that change has influenced the world we live in today. Also, there are some jokes about cheeseburgers. Additional reading: NIsa by Marjorie Shostak: https://goo.gl/hAPr5H First Farmers ...

    published: 26 Jan 2012
  • Dryland farming tradeoffs

    Michael Kotutwa JohnsonPh.D. Candidate, UA Native American Studies WRRC Conference 2016 https://wrrc.arizona.edu/sites/wrrc.arizona.edu/files/pdfs/JOHNSON.pdf

    published: 06 Apr 2016
  • I Recommend Cedar Hills | Testimonials for the City of Cedar Hills Utah | CedarHills.org

    Visit our website @ http://cedarhills.org/ Cedar Hills is built upon an alluvial fan, or bench, created thousands of years ago when it was a shoreline of Lake Bonneville. Early settlers referred to the area as "the Bench." Because of the growth of cedar trees (later becoming Manila's source of Christmas trees), the area was later referred to as Cedar Hills. The bench provides a beautiful view of the surrounding mountains, Utah Lake, and Utah Valley. Cedar Hills was established as a community in 1977. The surrounding cities such as Pleasant Grove and Alpine were settled in 1849 and 1850. Various forms of wildlife flourished in the area. Coyotes prowled along the bench. Wild cats, red foxes, bears, deer, skunks, and rabbits also lived in the area. Some deer, skunks, and rabbits can still b...

    published: 12 Nov 2012
  • Autumn 2015 | SPREADING [www.plakys.lt]

    MORE FARMING VIDEOS: Spring 2016 | Sugar Beet Sowing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bB0nvZAxIw SPREADING | John Deere 6150M + Bredal K45: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfkEwG9t59k Winter 2016 | Russian Tractors: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRYtwmsD9_Y Fendt 936 Vario + Vaderstad Cultus 500: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24ChRd0MNIY MTZ 80UK + FORTSCHRITT K454: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pbdJ96gG3Y Tractor Versatile 2375 + Vaderstad Carrier 820: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=by8v9L0ujJk John Deere 6630 + Hardi Navigator 4000: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IlaR-eIH5Dg Sugar Beet Harvest 2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmeOCTTH0fE Oilseed Rape Harvest 2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kW4iEja5RtM Operation: stone. Fendt 936 Vario + Case IH Magnum 250: h...

    published: 26 Jan 2016
  • ICTMN: Urban Native Food Sovereignty

    Monycka Snowbird (Ojibwe) narrates as her 10-year-old daughter, Bella (Ojibwe/Comanche), takes viewers through the process of respectfully caring for and butchering animals in the backyard of their small, urban farm in Colorado Springs.

    published: 19 Jul 2015
  • Native American Beef: 14-R Ranch

    published: 16 Oct 2013
  • Tall Grass Biomass for Biogas (Music Video of my MSc)

    This is the music video of my MSc thesis, and my submission to the EURAXESS Science Slam competition (update: turns out I won the North American division [!!!], so I'll be going to Europe in the spring! I'm excited, if that wasn't already evident from all the exclamation marks..). My name is Kurtis Baute, and I'm doing environmental science research through the University of Guelph. Feel free to share and subscribe, if that's what you'd like to do! YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/ScopeofScience Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/scopeofscience/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/kurtisbaute Blog: http://www.scopeofscience.com/ Filmed at the Centre for Agricultural Renewable Energy and Sustainability (CARES) at the University of Guelph Ridgetown Campus. For those of you who have been asking, I...

    published: 05 Aug 2014
  • F.A.C.E.S. at Cornell University

    F.A.C.E.S., Fostering Agricultural Communication and Extension Students, is a new grant program for Black, Hispanic and Native American second-year transfer students who are interested in the fields of Agriculture Science, Agribusiness, Food Industry Management, Food Science, or Viticulture and Enology. A partnership of Cornell's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the USDA, the program provides financial assistance, as well as exclusive mentoring and internship opportunities. Find out more about what life is like in the classroom, around campus and in Ithaca from these current Cornell students.

    published: 11 Mar 2013
  • The Agri Business Show, A Must Watch

    The Agri Business Show, A Must Watch

    published: 13 Feb 2017
  • Indigenous Farming Conference

    Register for the 15th Annual Indigenous Farming Conference Here: https://www.eventbee.com/v/15thindigenousfarmingconference#/tickets

    published: 05 Oct 2017
  • NATIVE FARM

    When your on the phone late at night. SUBSCRIBE for more Videos! Ahehee! Find us on Facebook @tomorrowshere

    published: 20 Aug 2016
  • Internet of food: Arduino-based, urban aquaponics in Oakland

    The land in West Oakland where Eric Maundu is trying to farm is covered with freeways, roads, light rail and parking lots so there's not much arable land and the soil is contaminated. So Maundu doesn't use soil. Instead he's growing plants using fish and circulating water. It's called aquaponics- a gardening system that combines hydroponics (water-based planting) and aquaculture (fish farming). It's been hailed as the future of farming: it uses less water (up to 90% less than traditional gardening), doesn't attract soil-based bugs and produces two types of produce (both plants and fish). Aquaponics has become popular in recent years among urban gardeners and DIY tinkerers, but Maundu- who is trained in industrial robotics- has taken the agricultural craft one step further and made his gard...

    published: 25 Jun 2012
  • Dairy farming | No America No Canada my native land India is best | Story of Dawinder Kaur

    Please subscribe this channel for stay tuned with us , For more info contact +919316428871

    published: 31 May 2017
  • Three Sisters Garden, Heritage Native American Farming Practices

    published: 15 Jul 2017
  • Cattle Farming Part 1 : Cattle Farming in the Philippines | Agribusiness Philippines

    Please watch: "Why OFW fails in starting a business and end up going back abroad " https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlfvo1eUSXs --~-- Cattle Farming Part 1 : Cattle Farming in the Philippines brought to you by Agribusiness Philippines. Let's join Mr. Paciano Ramis as he tells us about the opportunities and potentials of Cattle Farming as a business through the history and experiences of Jolisa Agribusiness Corporation. Agribusiness How It Works Philippines. Agriculture and Agribusiness opportunities for the Overseas Filipino Worker (OFW) and their families. Instruct. Inspire. Succeed.

    published: 06 May 2014
  • The Additive Pattern

    Tim Star of the Flowering Tree Permaculture Institute presents on permaculture patterns. Recorded during the Traditional Native American Farmers Association permaculture design course in Northern New Mexico - July 2010

    published: 14 Dec 2010
  • SEEDS: Economic Empowerment for Our Native Communities

    A new initiative proposed by the Administration for Native Americans, Sustainable Employment and Economic Development Strategies (SEEDS) creates jobs and businesses for Native American tribes and organizations.

    published: 07 Dec 2014
  • THE VISIONARIES - The Artists and The Indians

    Art from the Santa Fe and Taos Art Colonies from roughly the 1890's-1930's, much of it utilized throughout the Santa Fe Railway's advertising campaign for many, many years. This is nearly all American Indian subject matter. Music is by Robert Mirabal from Taos Pueblo titled "Painted Caves."

    published: 11 Jun 2009
developed with YouTube
Native American Farming (Influenced 75% of the World's Food Supply)
10:15

Native American Farming (Influenced 75% of the World's Food Supply)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:15
  • Updated: 25 Feb 2011
  • views: 7918
videos
Native Americans helped the colonists survive in their new environment. They gave the colonists new crops such as squash and maize, and taught them farming methods. Native Americans also taught the colonists a crop rotation system, which helped to preserve soil nutrients. The Native Americans had a wonderful knowledge of the natural materials in the world around them. They were able to teach the settlers about food, medicine and dyes. This information was very important to the colonists and they learned how to become farmers. Another method used by the Native American was a technique in which rows of crops were placed closely to one another. In between the first set of crops another set would be placed. This was an efficient method saving space and making the most out of the land. The tradition of saving space and preparing it for the next generation was important to the Native Americans.
https://wn.com/Native_American_Farming_(Influenced_75_Of_The_World's_Food_Supply)
Permaculture is like Native American agriculture
3:19

Permaculture is like Native American agriculture

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:19
  • Updated: 08 Feb 2011
  • views: 8407
videos
http://www.permies.com Heidi Bohan, author of "The People of Cascadia" talks about the Native American agriculture in the pacific northwest hundreds of years ago. She explains that the native american people that were here then were well beyond "hunter gatherer". They had an agriculture all their own. Much like permaculture. I think that this Native American idea of agriculture is far beyond current agriculture practices. Even beyond organic agriculture practices. The Native Americans used polyculture techniques and focused on plants reproducing themselves. Enhancing natural systems. Heidi mentions that the Native Americans would do burnings to help with production. Including to keep trees out of certain agrculture fields. You can learn more about Heidi and her book at http://www.peopleofcascadia.com music by Jimmy Pardo
https://wn.com/Permaculture_Is_Like_Native_American_Agriculture
Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24
12:44

Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:44
  • Updated: 09 Aug 2013
  • views: 1767552
videos
In which John Green teaches you about the Wild, Wild, West, which as it turns out, wasn't as wild as it seemed in the movies. When we think of the western expansion of the United States in the 19th century, we're conditioned to imagine the loner. The self-reliant, unattached cowpoke roaming the prairie in search of wandering calves, or the half-addled prospector who has broken from reality thanks to the solitude of his single-minded quest for gold dust. While there may be a grain of truth to these classic Hollywood stereotypes, it isn't a very big grain of truth. Many of the pioneers who settled the west were family groups. Many were immigrants. Many were major corporations. The big losers in the westward migration were Native Americans, who were killed or moved onto reservations. Not cool, American pioneers. Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. America’s Westward expansion was fueled by both Manifest Destiny and a desire to grow the nation and its resources — though at a cost: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/manifest-destiny As Americans continued to stream West on the name of Manifest Destiny, American Indians saw their lives changed forever as they moved from practising resistance to lives on reservations: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/from-resistance-to-reservations
https://wn.com/Westward_Expansion_Crash_Course_US_History_24
Agritourism: Every Field has a Story | Katharine Millonzi | TEDxHudson
14:23

Agritourism: Every Field has a Story | Katharine Millonzi | TEDxHudson

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:23
  • Updated: 03 Nov 2014
  • views: 5803
videos
This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Awarded a Fulbright to eat, drink, and study her way through Italy, Millonzi discovers new ways for American Agricultural enterprises to enliven and sustain their unique position in the creative and hospitality economies. An ethno-botanist and gastronome, Katharine Millonzi has worked with agriculturalists and policymakers in Kenya, India, Brazil, the Balkans, and across Europe, exploring the relationship between culture and food. Previously, she directed the Sustainable Food and Agriculture Program at Williams College, was head of staff at the New Economics Institute, and has consulted for a wide range of food-craft enterprises in New England. Millonzi was a 2007 Fulbright Fellow in Italy, where she spent eighteen months researching traditional food production and identity, amassing expertise on farm-based tourism and marketing. Her commitment to regional food systems has led her to the Hudson Valley to co-found FarmShare, an agritourism consultancy business. She is a native of New York City and the Berkshires, and is currently writing a book of stories about Balkan food culture called Fish on Fire. | katharinemillonzi.com, farmshareny.com About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
https://wn.com/Agritourism_Every_Field_Has_A_Story_|_Katharine_Millonzi_|_Tedxhudson
Native American Culture (8-1.1)
4:57

Native American Culture (8-1.1)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:57
  • Updated: 26 Aug 2017
  • views: 1371
videos
This video is aligned with 8th Grade South Carolina Social Studies Standards. Find more videos like this at www.scssvideos.com
https://wn.com/Native_American_Culture_(8_1.1)
Montana Rancher Feature: Karen Yost on the American Agri-Women
1:28

Montana Rancher Feature: Karen Yost on the American Agri-Women

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:28
  • Updated: 17 Jan 2014
  • views: 440
videos
Why do we need to tell the agriculture story? In this video, native Montanan, Karen Yost, shares her perspective on that topic and how one group of women is coming together to be a unified voice for agriculture.
https://wn.com/Montana_Rancher_Feature_Karen_Yost_On_The_American_Agri_Women
The Agricultural Revolution: Crash Course World History #1
11:11

The Agricultural Revolution: Crash Course World History #1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:11
  • Updated: 26 Jan 2012
  • views: 9176704
videos
Crash Course World History is now available on DVD! Visit http://store.dftba.com/products/crashcourse-world-history-the-complete-series-dvd-set to buy a set for your home or classroom. You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green investigates the dawn of human civilization. John looks into how people gave up hunting and gathering to become agriculturalists, and how that change has influenced the world we live in today. Also, there are some jokes about cheeseburgers. Additional reading: NIsa by Marjorie Shostak: https://goo.gl/hAPr5H First Farmers by Peter Bellwood: https://goo.gl/JqgHLW Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @raoulmeyer @crashcoursestan @saysdanica @thoughtbubbler Like us! ‪http://www.facebook.com/youtubecrashcourse Follow us again! ‪http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
https://wn.com/The_Agricultural_Revolution_Crash_Course_World_History_1
Dryland farming tradeoffs
9:14

Dryland farming tradeoffs

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:14
  • Updated: 06 Apr 2016
  • views: 858
videos
Michael Kotutwa JohnsonPh.D. Candidate, UA Native American Studies WRRC Conference 2016 https://wrrc.arizona.edu/sites/wrrc.arizona.edu/files/pdfs/JOHNSON.pdf
https://wn.com/Dryland_Farming_Tradeoffs
I Recommend Cedar Hills | Testimonials for the City of Cedar Hills Utah |  CedarHills.org
3:32

I Recommend Cedar Hills | Testimonials for the City of Cedar Hills Utah | CedarHills.org

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:32
  • Updated: 12 Nov 2012
  • views: 2288
videos
Visit our website @ http://cedarhills.org/ Cedar Hills is built upon an alluvial fan, or bench, created thousands of years ago when it was a shoreline of Lake Bonneville. Early settlers referred to the area as "the Bench." Because of the growth of cedar trees (later becoming Manila's source of Christmas trees), the area was later referred to as Cedar Hills. The bench provides a beautiful view of the surrounding mountains, Utah Lake, and Utah Valley. Cedar Hills was established as a community in 1977. The surrounding cities such as Pleasant Grove and Alpine were settled in 1849 and 1850. Various forms of wildlife flourished in the area. Coyotes prowled along the bench. Wild cats, red foxes, bears, deer, skunks, and rabbits also lived in the area. Some deer, skunks, and rabbits can still be seen around Cedar Hills. The dry bench upon which Cedar Hills is located provided little attraction to Native Americans. They preferred camping near streams, such as in American Fork Canyon. Several Native American artifacts were found upon the bench, however, including an Indian bowl (found by Paul Adams and currently on display at a Brigham Young University museum) and numerous arrowheads. The arrowheads were probably dropped during skirmishes between the Utah Valley Indians and the Shoshones. Between 1849 and 1850, early settlers began to make their homes in settlements around Cedar Hills. A large portion of Cedar Hills was used for dry farming, which proved to be unsuccessful. A few planted plots existed among the sage brush. Much of the area was used to pasture livestock. Other forms of livelihood among early settlers of Cedar Hills included trapping and turkey farming. The bench became a turkey ranch. The David Evans Company Advertising Agency, advertiser for the National Turkey Federation, would take pictures of the Adams turkey ranch because of its impressive background. In 1939, the National Poultry Congress in Cleveland, Ohio, displayed photographs of turkeys raised on the beautiful bench upon which Cedar Hills is now located. And, as NBC ran a news story about turkey farming on the bench, the photographer was taken back by the beauty of the bench and continued to say, "beautiful, beautiful." In 1962, the Saturday Evening Post also ran stories about turkeys living upon the bench. Interviewees: Chad Lewis: Father of 7 Jeanette Bennett: Owner/Editor, Utah Valley Magazine Kim Cahoon: Governor's daughter Ben Cahoon: Current BYU Football coach Rick and Lisa Stewart: Co-owner and CEO Stewarts Lawn Service Ralph and Ilene Walkers: Long Time Residents Shannon and Casey Child: Governor Herbert's daughter and mother of 4 | Founder of Good 2 Go Protein Bars Jared and Heather Osmond: Osmond designs and Osmond Senior Assisted Living owners Video produced by http://www.seovod.com Visit our website @ http://cedarhills.org/
https://wn.com/I_Recommend_Cedar_Hills_|_Testimonials_For_The_City_Of_Cedar_Hills_Utah_|_Cedarhills.Org
Autumn 2015 | SPREADING [www.plakys.lt]
5:05

Autumn 2015 | SPREADING [www.plakys.lt]

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:05
  • Updated: 26 Jan 2016
  • views: 3552
videos
MORE FARMING VIDEOS: Spring 2016 | Sugar Beet Sowing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bB0nvZAxIw SPREADING | John Deere 6150M + Bredal K45: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfkEwG9t59k Winter 2016 | Russian Tractors: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRYtwmsD9_Y Fendt 936 Vario + Vaderstad Cultus 500: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24ChRd0MNIY MTZ 80UK + FORTSCHRITT K454: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pbdJ96gG3Y Tractor Versatile 2375 + Vaderstad Carrier 820: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=by8v9L0ujJk John Deere 6630 + Hardi Navigator 4000: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IlaR-eIH5Dg Sugar Beet Harvest 2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmeOCTTH0fE Oilseed Rape Harvest 2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kW4iEja5RtM Operation: stone. Fendt 936 Vario + Case IH Magnum 250: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7-p0arRtqY John Deere 6630 + MVU-6: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQZvzVb0DJ8 Case IH Magnum 250 + Väderstad Cultus 500: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HgbRBFjcVdY Claas Lexion 550 + Class Lexion 670: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUrOJ8C65Zk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0LbFuoPZu4 Ropa euro-Maus 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvWQPtR-s6I JCB 535-95 Agri Super: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qywtLM6Om9Q Case Magnum 250 + Lemken EuroDiamant 10: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4GQUXPn26vQ Case Magnum 250 + Lemken Rubin 9: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ATOffNnC_Mo www.plakys.lt SUBSCRIBE CHANEL: https://www.youtube.com/user/empy666
https://wn.com/Autumn_2015_|_Spreading_Www.Plakys.Lt
ICTMN: Urban Native Food Sovereignty
1:32

ICTMN: Urban Native Food Sovereignty

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:32
  • Updated: 19 Jul 2015
  • views: 47
videos
Monycka Snowbird (Ojibwe) narrates as her 10-year-old daughter, Bella (Ojibwe/Comanche), takes viewers through the process of respectfully caring for and butchering animals in the backyard of their small, urban farm in Colorado Springs.
https://wn.com/Ictmn_Urban_Native_Food_Sovereignty
Native American Beef: 14-R Ranch
2:20

Native American Beef: 14-R Ranch

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:20
  • Updated: 16 Oct 2013
  • views: 235
videos
https://wn.com/Native_American_Beef_14_R_Ranch
Tall Grass Biomass for Biogas (Music Video of my MSc)
2:55

Tall Grass Biomass for Biogas (Music Video of my MSc)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:55
  • Updated: 05 Aug 2014
  • views: 6084
videos
This is the music video of my MSc thesis, and my submission to the EURAXESS Science Slam competition (update: turns out I won the North American division [!!!], so I'll be going to Europe in the spring! I'm excited, if that wasn't already evident from all the exclamation marks..). My name is Kurtis Baute, and I'm doing environmental science research through the University of Guelph. Feel free to share and subscribe, if that's what you'd like to do! YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/ScopeofScience Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/scopeofscience/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/kurtisbaute Blog: http://www.scopeofscience.com/ Filmed at the Centre for Agricultural Renewable Energy and Sustainability (CARES) at the University of Guelph Ridgetown Campus. For those of you who have been asking, I shot all of this with just me and a non-judgemental tripod. Subscribe: www.youtube.com/ScopeofScience Twitter: www.twitter.com/kurtisbaute Website: www.ScopeofScience.com Lyrics: A swamp monster much taller than a moose Invaded North America And now it’s on the loose It cant move or bite But puts up quite a fight A different kind of blight It’s a grass... The Common Reed What a mighty weed Look at these fields They have such high yields Can we turn you into power through A machine that devours you Take this tall grass And make some biogas? Biogas is a renewable fuel, let me explain: To make biogas Microbes degrade All kinds of biomass And methane is made It can make a fire Be used as a fuel Like farts that you can hire Though as a sorta rule We just call it biogas The Common Reed What a mighty weed Look at these fields They have such high yields Can we turn you into power through A machine that devours you Take this tall grass And make some biogas? If we could mix this grass With a bunch of poo It might make biogas And that’d be the clue But When is best to harvest? Is it summer or fall? Which would be the smartest? Will it make any gas at all? How does it compare With other biomass crops? We’ll collect them with a square See what comes out on top We’ll test it in a bottle And if all goes well We’ll kick up the throttle And capture the smell The Common Reed What a mighty weed Look at these fields They have such high yields Can we turn you into power through A machine that devours you Take this tall grass And make some biogas? For the sake of the cattail Can we harvest this reed? Put it into a bale And use it to feed A biogas machine Where it’ll break down Make energy that’s green And turn it back around Into a fertilizer To help grow food I’ll ask my advisor We’ll get it all reviewed! And it’ll be tall grass biomass for biogas (grass biomass for biogas) Tall grass biomass for making biogas (grass biomass for biogas) If this works on the whole Then reed could be chopped It’d give us some control Maybe the spread could be stopped. Tall grass biomass for making biogas (grass biomass for biogas)
https://wn.com/Tall_Grass_Biomass_For_Biogas_(Music_Video_Of_My_Msc)
F.A.C.E.S. at Cornell University
4:12

F.A.C.E.S. at Cornell University

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:12
  • Updated: 11 Mar 2013
  • views: 871
videos
F.A.C.E.S., Fostering Agricultural Communication and Extension Students, is a new grant program for Black, Hispanic and Native American second-year transfer students who are interested in the fields of Agriculture Science, Agribusiness, Food Industry Management, Food Science, or Viticulture and Enology. A partnership of Cornell's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the USDA, the program provides financial assistance, as well as exclusive mentoring and internship opportunities. Find out more about what life is like in the classroom, around campus and in Ithaca from these current Cornell students.
https://wn.com/F.A.C.E.S._At_Cornell_University
The Agri Business Show, A Must Watch
7:14

The Agri Business Show, A Must Watch

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:14
  • Updated: 13 Feb 2017
  • views: 338
videos
The Agri Business Show, A Must Watch
https://wn.com/The_Agri_Business_Show,_A_Must_Watch
Indigenous Farming Conference
2:03

Indigenous Farming Conference

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  • Duration: 2:03
  • Updated: 05 Oct 2017
  • views: 503
videos
Register for the 15th Annual Indigenous Farming Conference Here: https://www.eventbee.com/v/15thindigenousfarmingconference#/tickets
https://wn.com/Indigenous_Farming_Conference
NATIVE FARM
1:16

NATIVE FARM

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  • Duration: 1:16
  • Updated: 20 Aug 2016
  • views: 2679
videos
When your on the phone late at night. SUBSCRIBE for more Videos! Ahehee! Find us on Facebook @tomorrowshere
https://wn.com/Native_Farm
Internet of food: Arduino-based, urban aquaponics in Oakland
13:37

Internet of food: Arduino-based, urban aquaponics in Oakland

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  • Duration: 13:37
  • Updated: 25 Jun 2012
  • views: 905432
videos
The land in West Oakland where Eric Maundu is trying to farm is covered with freeways, roads, light rail and parking lots so there's not much arable land and the soil is contaminated. So Maundu doesn't use soil. Instead he's growing plants using fish and circulating water. It's called aquaponics- a gardening system that combines hydroponics (water-based planting) and aquaculture (fish farming). It's been hailed as the future of farming: it uses less water (up to 90% less than traditional gardening), doesn't attract soil-based bugs and produces two types of produce (both plants and fish). Aquaponics has become popular in recent years among urban gardeners and DIY tinkerers, but Maundu- who is trained in industrial robotics- has taken the agricultural craft one step further and made his gardens smart. Using sensors (to detect water level, pH and temperature), microprocessors (mostly the open-source Arduino microcontroller), relay cards, clouds and social media networks (Twitter and Facebook), Maundu has programmed his gardens to tweet when there's a problem (e.g. not enough water) or when there's news (e.g. an over-abundance of food to share). Maundu himself ran from agriculture in his native Kenya- where he saw it as a struggle for land, water and resources. This changed when he realized he could farm without soil and with little water via aquaponics and that he could apply his robotics background to farming. Today he runs Kijani Grows ("Kijani" is Swahili for green), a small startup that designs and sells custom aquaponics systems for growing food and attempts to explore new frontiers of computer-controlled gardening. Maundu believes that by putting gardens online, especially in places like West Oakland (where his solar-powered gardens are totally off the grid), it's the only way to make sure that farming remains viable to the next generation of urban youth. More info on original story: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/internet-food-arduino-based-urban-aquaponics-in-oakland/
https://wn.com/Internet_Of_Food_Arduino_Based,_Urban_Aquaponics_In_Oakland
Dairy farming | No America No Canada my native land India is best  | Story of Dawinder Kaur
10:51

Dairy farming | No America No Canada my native land India is best | Story of Dawinder Kaur

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  • Duration: 10:51
  • Updated: 31 May 2017
  • views: 235102
videos
Please subscribe this channel for stay tuned with us , For more info contact +919316428871
https://wn.com/Dairy_Farming_|_No_America_No_Canada_My_Native_Land_India_Is_Best_|_Story_Of_Dawinder_Kaur
Three Sisters Garden, Heritage Native American Farming Practices
3:25

Three Sisters Garden, Heritage Native American Farming Practices

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  • Duration: 3:25
  • Updated: 15 Jul 2017
  • views: 235
videos
https://wn.com/Three_Sisters_Garden,_Heritage_Native_American_Farming_Practices
Cattle Farming Part 1 : Cattle Farming in the Philippines | Agribusiness Philippines
9:09

Cattle Farming Part 1 : Cattle Farming in the Philippines | Agribusiness Philippines

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  • Duration: 9:09
  • Updated: 06 May 2014
  • views: 291928
videos
Please watch: "Why OFW fails in starting a business and end up going back abroad " https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlfvo1eUSXs --~-- Cattle Farming Part 1 : Cattle Farming in the Philippines brought to you by Agribusiness Philippines. Let's join Mr. Paciano Ramis as he tells us about the opportunities and potentials of Cattle Farming as a business through the history and experiences of Jolisa Agribusiness Corporation. Agribusiness How It Works Philippines. Agriculture and Agribusiness opportunities for the Overseas Filipino Worker (OFW) and their families. Instruct. Inspire. Succeed.
https://wn.com/Cattle_Farming_Part_1_Cattle_Farming_In_The_Philippines_|_Agribusiness_Philippines
The Additive Pattern
14:57

The Additive Pattern

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  • Duration: 14:57
  • Updated: 14 Dec 2010
  • views: 1051
videos
Tim Star of the Flowering Tree Permaculture Institute presents on permaculture patterns. Recorded during the Traditional Native American Farmers Association permaculture design course in Northern New Mexico - July 2010
https://wn.com/The_Additive_Pattern
SEEDS: Economic Empowerment for Our Native Communities
1:16:14

SEEDS: Economic Empowerment for Our Native Communities

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  • Duration: 1:16:14
  • Updated: 07 Dec 2014
  • views: 145
videos
A new initiative proposed by the Administration for Native Americans, Sustainable Employment and Economic Development Strategies (SEEDS) creates jobs and businesses for Native American tribes and organizations.
https://wn.com/Seeds_Economic_Empowerment_For_Our_Native_Communities
THE VISIONARIES - The Artists and The Indians
4:28

THE VISIONARIES - The Artists and The Indians

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  • Duration: 4:28
  • Updated: 11 Jun 2009
  • views: 2904
videos
Art from the Santa Fe and Taos Art Colonies from roughly the 1890's-1930's, much of it utilized throughout the Santa Fe Railway's advertising campaign for many, many years. This is nearly all American Indian subject matter. Music is by Robert Mirabal from Taos Pueblo titled "Painted Caves."
https://wn.com/The_Visionaries_The_Artists_And_The_Indians
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