• Permaculture is like Native American agriculture

    http://www.permies.com Heidi Bohan, author of "The People of Cascadia" talks about the Native American agriculture in the pacific northwest hundreds of years ago. She explains that the native american people that were here then were well beyond "hunter gatherer". They had an agriculture all their own. Much like permaculture. I think that this Native American idea of agriculture is far beyond current agriculture practices. Even beyond organic agriculture practices. The Native Americans used polyculture techniques and focused on plants reproducing themselves. Enhancing natural systems. Heidi mentions that the Native Americans would do burnings to help with production. Including to keep trees out of certain agrculture fields. You can learn more about Heidi and her book at...

    published: 08 Feb 2011
  • The World's most advanced Agriculture

    Native Americans helped the colonists survive in their new environment. They gave the colonists new crops such as squash and maize, and taught them farming methods. Native Americans also taught the colonists a crop rotation system, which helped to preserve soil nutrients. The Native Americans had a wonderful knowledge of the natural materials in the world around them. They were able to teach the settlers about food, medicine and dyes. This information was very important to the colonists and they learned how to become farmers. Another method used by the Native American was a technique in which rows of crops were placed closely to one another. In between the first set of crops another set would be placed. This was an efficient method saving space and making the most out of the land. The t...

    published: 25 Feb 2011
  • The Great Laws of Nature: Indigenous Organic Agriculture Documentary

    Let's reconnect with our relatives in nature In 2013: the plant beings: A group of First Nations People in Saskatchewan Canada are reclaiming their Indigenous organic and natural agricultural heritage, reconnecting with Nature, learning and observing her natural laws, and getting back on the road to self-reliance. This video is presented here courtesy of Muskoday Organic Growers Co-op.. If you want to purchase a copy of this video please contact the producers through this link: rivard@rivard.tv

    published: 20 Dec 2011
  • Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24

    In which John Green teaches you about the Wild, Wild, West, which as it turns out, wasn't as wild as it seemed in the movies. When we think of the western expansion of the United States in the 19th century, we're conditioned to imagine the loner. The self-reliant, unattached cowpoke roaming the prairie in search of wandering calves, or the half-addled prospector who has broken from reality thanks to the solitude of his single-minded quest for gold dust. While there may be a grain of truth to these classic Hollywood stereotypes, it isn't a very big grain of truth. Many of the pioneers who settled the west were family groups. Many were immigrants. Many were major corporations. The big losers in the westward migration were Native Americans, who were killed or moved onto reservations. Not cool...

    published: 09 Aug 2013
  • Native America before European Colonization

    Upon the arrival of Columbus in 1492 in the Carabean Islands, unknown to Columbus (and majority of the Eastern Hemisphere), he landed on Islands located in the middle of two huge continents now known has North America and South America that was teaming with huge Civilizations (that rivaled any in the world at that time) and thousands of smaller Nations and Tribes. With recent estimations, the population may have been over 100 million people that spanned from Alaska and Green Land, all the to the tip of southern South America. Pre Colombian North America (north of Mesoamerica): In Pre-Canada, most people lived along the coast, along the major rivers "I'll finishing editing this soon"

    published: 08 Apr 2013
  • Montana Rancher Feature: Karen Yost on the American Agri-Women

    Why do we need to tell the agriculture story? In this video, native Montanan, Karen Yost, shares her perspective on that topic and how one group of women is coming together to be a unified voice for agriculture.

    published: 17 Jan 2014
  • NATIVE FARM

    When your on the phone late at night. SUBSCRIBE for more Videos! Ahehee! Find us on Facebook @tomorrowshere

    published: 20 Aug 2016
  • Sheep Ranching: "Sheep" 1954 The Texas Company (Texaco); How Sheep are Raised, Sheared & Cut

    Agriculture: Farming, Ranching playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL897E774CDB19F283 more at http://quickfound.net/links/agriculture_news_and_links.html Sheep ranching overview: breeds of sheep (Merino, Ram-bouillet, Southdown, Suffolk, Shropshire, Hampshire, Cheviot, Oxford, Dorset, Corriedale), shearing sheep wool, cuts of meat... Some music had to be removed from this film due to a copyright content match. Public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound,...

    published: 06 Jul 2016
  • TNAFA Permaculture & Design Course

    Some pictures from 2008 summer permaculture training hosted by the Traditional Native American Farmers Association.

    published: 12 Oct 2008
  • How Montana tribes rely on tradition to fight climate change

    In Western Montana, global warming is obvious. Scientists are studying melting glaciers at Glacier National Park and Native Americans are seeing it firsthand in their homelands. Some tribal leaders there are looking to their ancestral values as they adapt to climate change.

    published: 27 May 2016
  • Agritourism: Every Field has a Story | Katharine Millonzi | TEDxHudson

    This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Awarded a Fulbright to eat, drink, and study her way through Italy, Millonzi discovers new ways for American Agricultural enterprises to enliven and sustain their unique position in the creative and hospitality economies. An ethno-botanist and gastronome, Katharine Millonzi has worked with agriculturalists and policymakers in Kenya, India, Brazil, the Balkans, and across Europe, exploring the relationship between culture and food. Previously, she directed the Sustainable Food and Agriculture Program at Williams College, was head of staff at the New Economics Institute, and has consulted for a wide range of food-craft enterprises in New England. Millonzi was a 2007 Fulbright Fellow in Italy, where sh...

    published: 03 Nov 2014
  • Research yields maize varieties resistant to stalk borer pest

    African smallholder farmers are grappling with agricultural challenges, including devastating pests that affect staple crops such as maize, cotton and cassava, leading to poor yields. In this production on farmers from Kilifi County in Kenya’s costal region, SciDev.Net shows how the maize stalk borer pest attacks the maize crop, leading to poor production and suffering for local smallholders. The stalk borer — native to North America — infests the plant’s stalk and upper leaves, causing wilting and can lead to death or stunting. According to scientists, stem borers reduce overall maize production in Kenya by an average of 13 per cent or 400,000 tonnes, which is equivalent to the normal yearly quantity that the country has to import to meet the deficit. The stalk borer and other pests ha...

    published: 25 Nov 2015
  • Interview with Indian agricultural expert on Latin American farming

    Hasmukh Patel, General Manager of Agrocel Indsutries (http://agrocel.co.in/), a division of Excel Crop Care, Mumbai gives his impressions on Latin American agriculture after visiting Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay with Allied Venture (www.alliedventure.com) farm tour service

    published: 13 May 2010
  • Pope Francis Sorry for Grave Crimes Against Native People | #WorldNews

    Pope Francis apologizes for Catholic church’s crimes against indigenous peoples Santa Cruz, Bolivia, Thursday, July 9, 2015. Pope Francis has asked forgiveness from the indigenous peoples of Latin America for the many crimes committed by the Catholic church during the “so-called conquest of America.” In an historic speech to the “World Meeting of the Popular Movements” in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, which was attended by many indigenous people, he said: “I want to tell you, and I want to be very clear: I humbly ask your forgiveness, not only for the offenses committed by the Church herself, but also for the crimes committed against the native peoples during the so-called conquest of America.” The conquest and the theft of their land led to the genocide of millions of indigenous people who we...

    published: 29 Jul 2015
  • How to grow Chilli Peppers video with Thompson & Morgan

    Chillies are surprisingly easy to grow, and there's a chilli pepper to suit everybody's tastebuds. Learn how to grow your own chillies with our helpful video guide. Click here to view our full range of chili peppers http://tinyurl.com/dxgrbmt For more information on growing chillies click here http://tinyurl.com/778f7rf

    published: 24 May 2012
  • Funny African Kid Dancing - Funny Babies Videos 2016

    Funny African Kid Dancing - Funny Babies Videos 2016 - Funny African Baby Dancing - Funny Babies Videos 2016 - Funny African Baby Dancing - Funny Kids Videos 2016 - Funny African Toddler Dancing - Funny Toddlers Videos 2016

    published: 21 Oct 2016
Permaculture is like Native American agriculture

Permaculture is like Native American agriculture

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:19
  • Updated: 08 Feb 2011
  • views: 8021
videos
http://www.permies.com Heidi Bohan, author of "The People of Cascadia" talks about the Native American agriculture in the pacific northwest hundreds of years ago. She explains that the native american people that were here then were well beyond "hunter gatherer". They had an agriculture all their own. Much like permaculture. I think that this Native American idea of agriculture is far beyond current agriculture practices. Even beyond organic agriculture practices. The Native Americans used polyculture techniques and focused on plants reproducing themselves. Enhancing natural systems. Heidi mentions that the Native Americans would do burnings to help with production. Including to keep trees out of certain agrculture fields. You can learn more about Heidi and her book at http://www.peopleofcascadia.com music by Jimmy Pardo
https://wn.com/Permaculture_Is_Like_Native_American_Agriculture
The World's most advanced Agriculture

The World's most advanced Agriculture

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:15
  • Updated: 25 Feb 2011
  • views: 7046
videos
Native Americans helped the colonists survive in their new environment. They gave the colonists new crops such as squash and maize, and taught them farming methods. Native Americans also taught the colonists a crop rotation system, which helped to preserve soil nutrients. The Native Americans had a wonderful knowledge of the natural materials in the world around them. They were able to teach the settlers about food, medicine and dyes. This information was very important to the colonists and they learned how to become farmers. Another method used by the Native American was a technique in which rows of crops were placed closely to one another. In between the first set of crops another set would be placed. This was an efficient method saving space and making the most out of the land. The tradition of saving space and preparing it for the next generation was important to the Native Americans.
https://wn.com/The_World's_Most_Advanced_Agriculture
The Great Laws of Nature: Indigenous Organic Agriculture Documentary

The Great Laws of Nature: Indigenous Organic Agriculture Documentary

  • Order:
  • Duration: 22:23
  • Updated: 20 Dec 2011
  • views: 130510
videos
Let's reconnect with our relatives in nature In 2013: the plant beings: A group of First Nations People in Saskatchewan Canada are reclaiming their Indigenous organic and natural agricultural heritage, reconnecting with Nature, learning and observing her natural laws, and getting back on the road to self-reliance. This video is presented here courtesy of Muskoday Organic Growers Co-op.. If you want to purchase a copy of this video please contact the producers through this link: rivard@rivard.tv
https://wn.com/The_Great_Laws_Of_Nature_Indigenous_Organic_Agriculture_Documentary
Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24

Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:44
  • Updated: 09 Aug 2013
  • views: 1224808
videos
In which John Green teaches you about the Wild, Wild, West, which as it turns out, wasn't as wild as it seemed in the movies. When we think of the western expansion of the United States in the 19th century, we're conditioned to imagine the loner. The self-reliant, unattached cowpoke roaming the prairie in search of wandering calves, or the half-addled prospector who has broken from reality thanks to the solitude of his single-minded quest for gold dust. While there may be a grain of truth to these classic Hollywood stereotypes, it isn't a very big grain of truth. Many of the pioneers who settled the west were family groups. Many were immigrants. Many were major corporations. The big losers in the westward migration were Native Americans, who were killed or moved onto reservations. Not cool, American pioneers. Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. America’s Westward expansion was fueled by both Manifest Destiny and a desire to grow the nation and its resources — though at a cost: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/manifest-destiny As Americans continued to stream West on the name of Manifest Destiny, American Indians saw their lives changed forever as they moved from practising resistance to lives on reservations: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/from-resistance-to-reservations
https://wn.com/Westward_Expansion_Crash_Course_US_History_24
Native America before European Colonization

Native America before European Colonization

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:37:51
  • Updated: 08 Apr 2013
  • views: 7920214
videos
Upon the arrival of Columbus in 1492 in the Carabean Islands, unknown to Columbus (and majority of the Eastern Hemisphere), he landed on Islands located in the middle of two huge continents now known has North America and South America that was teaming with huge Civilizations (that rivaled any in the world at that time) and thousands of smaller Nations and Tribes. With recent estimations, the population may have been over 100 million people that spanned from Alaska and Green Land, all the to the tip of southern South America. Pre Colombian North America (north of Mesoamerica): In Pre-Canada, most people lived along the coast, along the major rivers "I'll finishing editing this soon"
https://wn.com/Native_America_Before_European_Colonization
Montana Rancher Feature: Karen Yost on the American Agri-Women

Montana Rancher Feature: Karen Yost on the American Agri-Women

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:28
  • Updated: 17 Jan 2014
  • views: 406
videos
Why do we need to tell the agriculture story? In this video, native Montanan, Karen Yost, shares her perspective on that topic and how one group of women is coming together to be a unified voice for agriculture.
https://wn.com/Montana_Rancher_Feature_Karen_Yost_On_The_American_Agri_Women
NATIVE FARM

NATIVE FARM

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:16
  • Updated: 20 Aug 2016
  • views: 1952
videos
When your on the phone late at night. SUBSCRIBE for more Videos! Ahehee! Find us on Facebook @tomorrowshere
https://wn.com/Native_Farm
Sheep Ranching: "Sheep" 1954 The Texas Company (Texaco); How Sheep are Raised, Sheared & Cut

Sheep Ranching: "Sheep" 1954 The Texas Company (Texaco); How Sheep are Raised, Sheared & Cut

  • Order:
  • Duration: 24:26
  • Updated: 06 Jul 2016
  • views: 850
videos
Agriculture: Farming, Ranching playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL897E774CDB19F283 more at http://quickfound.net/links/agriculture_news_and_links.html Sheep ranching overview: breeds of sheep (Merino, Ram-bouillet, Southdown, Suffolk, Shropshire, Hampshire, Cheviot, Oxford, Dorset, Corriedale), shearing sheep wool, cuts of meat... Some music had to be removed from this film due to a copyright content match. Public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranch A ranch is an area of landscape, including various structures, given primarily to the practice of ranching, the practice of raising grazing livestock such as cattle or sheep for meat or wool. The word most often applies to livestock-raising operations in the western United States and Canada, though there are ranches in other areas. People who own or operate a ranch are called ranchers, or stockgrowers. Ranching is also a method used to raise less common livestock such as elk, American bison or even ostrich, emu, and alpacas. Ranches generally consist of large areas, but may be of nearly any size. In the western United States, many ranches are a combination of privately owned land supplemented by grazing leases on land under the control of the federal Bureau of Land Management. If the ranch includes arable or irrigated land, the ranch may also engage in a limited amount of farming, raising crops for feeding the animals, such as hay and feed grains. Ranches that cater exclusively to tourists are called guest ranches or, colloquially, "dude ranches." Most working ranches do not cater to guests, though they may allow private hunters or outfitters onto their property to hunt native wildlife. However, in recent years, a few struggling smaller operations have added some dude ranch features, such as horseback rides, cattle drives or guided hunting, in an attempt to bring in additional income. Ranching is part of the iconography of the "Wild West" as seen in Western movies and rodeos. Ranch occupations The person who owns and manages the operation of a ranch is usually called a rancher, but the terms cattleman, stockgrower, or stockman are also sometimes used... The people who are employees of the rancher and involved in handling livestock are called a number of terms, including cowhand, ranch hand, and cowboy. People exclusively involved with handling horses are sometimes called wranglers. Origins of ranching Ranching and the cowboy tradition originated in Spain, out of the necessity to handle large herds of grazing animals on dry land from horseback. During the Reconquista, members of the Spanish nobility and various military orders received large land grants that the Kingdom of Castile had conquered from the Moors. These landowners were to defend the lands put into their control and could use them for earning revenue. In the process it was found that open-range breeding of sheep and cattle (under the Mesta system) was the most suitable use for vast tracts, particularly in the parts of Spain now known as Castilla-La Mancha, Extremadura and Andalusia... The prairie and desert lands of what today is Mexico and the western United States were well-suited to "open range" grazing... The use of livestock branding allowed the cattle owned by different ranchers to be identified and sorted. Beginning with the settlement of Texas in the 1840s, and expansion both north and west from that time, through the Civil War and into the 1880s, ranching dominated western economic activity. Along with ranchers came the need for agricultural crops to feed both humans and livestock, and hence many farmers also came west along with ranchers. Many operations were "diversified," with both ranching and farming activities taking place. With the Homestead Act of 1862, more settlers came west to set up farms. This created some conflict, as increasing numbers of farmers needed to fence off fields to prevent cattle and sheep from eating their crops. Barbed wire, invented in 1874, gradually made inroads in fencing off privately owned land, especially for homesteads. There was some reduction of land on the Great Plains open to grazing...
https://wn.com/Sheep_Ranching_Sheep_1954_The_Texas_Company_(Texaco)_How_Sheep_Are_Raised,_Sheared_Cut
TNAFA Permaculture & Design Course

TNAFA Permaculture & Design Course

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:50
  • Updated: 12 Oct 2008
  • views: 600
videos
Some pictures from 2008 summer permaculture training hosted by the Traditional Native American Farmers Association.
https://wn.com/Tnafa_Permaculture_Design_Course
How Montana tribes rely on tradition to fight climate change

How Montana tribes rely on tradition to fight climate change

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:28
  • Updated: 27 May 2016
  • views: 418
videos
In Western Montana, global warming is obvious. Scientists are studying melting glaciers at Glacier National Park and Native Americans are seeing it firsthand in their homelands. Some tribal leaders there are looking to their ancestral values as they adapt to climate change.
https://wn.com/How_Montana_Tribes_Rely_On_Tradition_To_Fight_Climate_Change
Agritourism: Every Field has a Story | Katharine Millonzi | TEDxHudson

Agritourism: Every Field has a Story | Katharine Millonzi | TEDxHudson

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:23
  • Updated: 03 Nov 2014
  • views: 2719
videos
This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Awarded a Fulbright to eat, drink, and study her way through Italy, Millonzi discovers new ways for American Agricultural enterprises to enliven and sustain their unique position in the creative and hospitality economies. An ethno-botanist and gastronome, Katharine Millonzi has worked with agriculturalists and policymakers in Kenya, India, Brazil, the Balkans, and across Europe, exploring the relationship between culture and food. Previously, she directed the Sustainable Food and Agriculture Program at Williams College, was head of staff at the New Economics Institute, and has consulted for a wide range of food-craft enterprises in New England. Millonzi was a 2007 Fulbright Fellow in Italy, where she spent eighteen months researching traditional food production and identity, amassing expertise on farm-based tourism and marketing. Her commitment to regional food systems has led her to the Hudson Valley to co-found FarmShare, an agritourism consultancy business. She is a native of New York City and the Berkshires, and is currently writing a book of stories about Balkan food culture called Fish on Fire. | katharinemillonzi.com, farmshareny.com About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
https://wn.com/Agritourism_Every_Field_Has_A_Story_|_Katharine_Millonzi_|_Tedxhudson
Research yields maize varieties resistant to stalk borer pest

Research yields maize varieties resistant to stalk borer pest

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:33
  • Updated: 25 Nov 2015
  • views: 226
videos
African smallholder farmers are grappling with agricultural challenges, including devastating pests that affect staple crops such as maize, cotton and cassava, leading to poor yields. In this production on farmers from Kilifi County in Kenya’s costal region, SciDev.Net shows how the maize stalk borer pest attacks the maize crop, leading to poor production and suffering for local smallholders. The stalk borer — native to North America — infests the plant’s stalk and upper leaves, causing wilting and can lead to death or stunting. According to scientists, stem borers reduce overall maize production in Kenya by an average of 13 per cent or 400,000 tonnes, which is equivalent to the normal yearly quantity that the country has to import to meet the deficit. The stalk borer and other pests have adversely affected the production of maize, the staple food for more than 80 per cent of the Kenyan population. To address this problem, scientists working under the Water Efficient Maize for Africa (WEMA) public-private sector project, have conducted research and developed varieties that can withstand the stalk borer pest. Researchers from the Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organisation (KALRO) and partners have developed varieties resistant to the stalk borer and promising farmers’ better fortunes. If adopted, Kenyan farmers will get stalk borer-resistant maize varieties resulting from many years of scientific search for a solution to relieve them from the shackles of the pest, and in the process increase production on their fields, contributing to improved livelihoods. Disclaimer: The International Service for Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) sponsored a media trip to Kenya’s coast where Verenardo Meeme and Gilbert Nakweya shot this multimedia. This piece was produced by SciDev.Net’s {South-East Asia & Pacific/Sub-Saharan Africa English desk.
https://wn.com/Research_Yields_Maize_Varieties_Resistant_To_Stalk_Borer_Pest
Interview with Indian agricultural expert on Latin American farming

Interview with Indian agricultural expert on Latin American farming

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:23
  • Updated: 13 May 2010
  • views: 911
videos
Hasmukh Patel, General Manager of Agrocel Indsutries (http://agrocel.co.in/), a division of Excel Crop Care, Mumbai gives his impressions on Latin American agriculture after visiting Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay with Allied Venture (www.alliedventure.com) farm tour service
https://wn.com/Interview_With_Indian_Agricultural_Expert_On_Latin_American_Farming
Pope Francis Sorry for Grave Crimes Against Native People | #WorldNews

Pope Francis Sorry for Grave Crimes Against Native People | #WorldNews

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:44
  • Updated: 29 Jul 2015
  • views: 279
videos
Pope Francis apologizes for Catholic church’s crimes against indigenous peoples Santa Cruz, Bolivia, Thursday, July 9, 2015. Pope Francis has asked forgiveness from the indigenous peoples of Latin America for the many crimes committed by the Catholic church during the “so-called conquest of America.” In an historic speech to the “World Meeting of the Popular Movements” in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, which was attended by many indigenous people, he said: “I want to tell you, and I want to be very clear: I humbly ask your forgiveness, not only for the offenses committed by the Church herself, but also for the crimes committed against the native peoples during the so-called conquest of America.” The conquest and the theft of their land led to the genocide of millions of indigenous people who were killed by invaders or died of introduced diseases to which they had no resistance. He acknowledged the depth of suffering by indigenous peoples: “I say this to you with regret: Many grave sins were committed against the native people of America in the name of God.” He also spoke of his “deep affection and appreciation” for the Latin American indigenous movement’s “quest for a multiculturalism which combines the defense of the rights of the native peoples with respect for the territorial integrity of states … [which] is for all of us a source of enrichment and encouragement.” Guarani spokesman Eliseu Lopes met the Pope during his visit and said: “He listened to me, something which the president and those who govern Brazil have never done and refuse to do, even though they know our situation … I told him that we are living through a war, that we are dying and that we are being massacred by armed gunmen and by the politicians involved in agri-business, that a real genocide is happening to us. I asked for a future for our young and old people.” The Pope spent a week visiting Ecuador, Bolivia and Paraguay, where indigenous peoples are battling to protect their lands and natural resources against governments and corporations intent on imposing large-scale development projects on them. *** The world’s threatened tribal, peoples: #Australia: Aboriginal people, Australia. #Canada: Innu, Canada. #America: Native Americans/American Red Indians, America. 150 million tribal people live in more than 60 countries across the world Although their land ownership rights are recognized in international law, they are not properly respected anywhere * [Video Credit: FRANCE 24]
https://wn.com/Pope_Francis_Sorry_For_Grave_Crimes_Against_Native_People_|_Worldnews
How to grow Chilli Peppers video with Thompson & Morgan

How to grow Chilli Peppers video with Thompson & Morgan

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:19
  • Updated: 24 May 2012
  • views: 397947
videos
Chillies are surprisingly easy to grow, and there's a chilli pepper to suit everybody's tastebuds. Learn how to grow your own chillies with our helpful video guide. Click here to view our full range of chili peppers http://tinyurl.com/dxgrbmt For more information on growing chillies click here http://tinyurl.com/778f7rf
https://wn.com/How_To_Grow_Chilli_Peppers_Video_With_Thompson_Morgan
Funny African Kid Dancing - Funny Babies Videos 2016

Funny African Kid Dancing - Funny Babies Videos 2016

  • Order:
  • Duration: 16:23
  • Updated: 21 Oct 2016
  • views: 753630
videos
Funny African Kid Dancing - Funny Babies Videos 2016 - Funny African Baby Dancing - Funny Babies Videos 2016 - Funny African Baby Dancing - Funny Kids Videos 2016 - Funny African Toddler Dancing - Funny Toddlers Videos 2016
https://wn.com/Funny_African_Kid_Dancing_Funny_Babies_Videos_2016
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