• The Great Laws of Nature: Indigenous Organic Agriculture Documentary

    Let's reconnect with our relatives in nature In 2013: the plant beings: A group of First Nations People in Saskatchewan Canada are reclaiming their Indigenous organic and natural agricultural heritage, reconnecting with Nature, learning and observing her natural laws, and getting back on the road to self-reliance. This video is presented here courtesy of Muskoday Organic Growers Co-op.. If you want to purchase a copy of this video please contact the producers through this link: rivard@rivard.tv

    published: 20 Dec 2011
  • Permaculture is like Native American agriculture

    http://www.permies.com Heidi Bohan, author of "The People of Cascadia" talks about the Native American agriculture in the pacific northwest hundreds of years ago. She explains that the native american people that were here then were well beyond "hunter gatherer". They had an agriculture all their own. Much like permaculture. I think that this Native American idea of agriculture is far beyond current agriculture practices. Even beyond organic agriculture practices. The Native Americans used polyculture techniques and focused on plants reproducing themselves. Enhancing natural systems. Heidi mentions that the Native Americans would do burnings to help with production. Including to keep trees out of certain agrculture fields. You can learn more about Heidi and her book at...

    published: 08 Feb 2011
  • Native American Farming (Influenced 75% of the World's Food Supply)

    Native Americans helped the colonists survive in their new environment. They gave the colonists new crops such as squash and maize, and taught them farming methods. Native Americans also taught the colonists a crop rotation system, which helped to preserve soil nutrients. The Native Americans had a wonderful knowledge of the natural materials in the world around them. They were able to teach the settlers about food, medicine and dyes. This information was very important to the colonists and they learned how to become farmers. Another method used by the Native American was a technique in which rows of crops were placed closely to one another. In between the first set of crops another set would be placed. This was an efficient method saving space and making the most out of the land. The t...

    published: 25 Feb 2011
  • Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24

    In which John Green teaches you about the Wild, Wild, West, which as it turns out, wasn't as wild as it seemed in the movies. When we think of the western expansion of the United States in the 19th century, we're conditioned to imagine the loner. The self-reliant, unattached cowpoke roaming the prairie in search of wandering calves, or the half-addled prospector who has broken from reality thanks to the solitude of his single-minded quest for gold dust. While there may be a grain of truth to these classic Hollywood stereotypes, it isn't a very big grain of truth. Many of the pioneers who settled the west were family groups. Many were immigrants. Many were major corporations. The big losers in the westward migration were Native Americans, who were killed or moved onto reservations. Not cool...

    published: 09 Aug 2013
  • Native America before European Colonization

    Upon the arrival of Columbus in 1492 in the Carabean Islands, unknown to Columbus (and majority of the Eastern Hemisphere), he landed on Islands located in the middle of two huge continents now known has North America and South America that was teaming with huge Civilizations (that rivaled any in the world at that time) and thousands of smaller Nations and Tribes. With recent estimations, the population may have been over 100 million people that spanned from Alaska and Green Land, all the to the tip of southern South America. Pre Colombian North America (north of Mesoamerica): In Pre-Canada, most people lived along the coast, along the major rivers "I'll finishing editing this soon"

    published: 08 Apr 2013
  • Montana Rancher Feature: Karen Yost on the American Agri-Women

    Why do we need to tell the agriculture story? In this video, native Montanan, Karen Yost, shares her perspective on that topic and how one group of women is coming together to be a unified voice for agriculture.

    published: 17 Jan 2014
  • Agritourism: Every Field has a Story | Katharine Millonzi | TEDxHudson

    This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Awarded a Fulbright to eat, drink, and study her way through Italy, Millonzi discovers new ways for American Agricultural enterprises to enliven and sustain their unique position in the creative and hospitality economies. An ethno-botanist and gastronome, Katharine Millonzi has worked with agriculturalists and policymakers in Kenya, India, Brazil, the Balkans, and across Europe, exploring the relationship between culture and food. Previously, she directed the Sustainable Food and Agriculture Program at Williams College, was head of staff at the New Economics Institute, and has consulted for a wide range of food-craft enterprises in New England. Millonzi was a 2007 Fulbright Fellow in Italy, where sh...

    published: 03 Nov 2014
  • NATIVE FARM

    When your on the phone late at night. SUBSCRIBE for more Videos! Ahehee! Find us on Facebook @tomorrowshere

    published: 20 Aug 2016
  • Sheep Ranching: "Sheep" 1954 The Texas Company (Texaco); How Sheep are Raised, Sheared & Cut

    Agriculture: Farming, Ranching playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL897E774CDB19F283 more at http://quickfound.net/links/agriculture_news_and_links.html Sheep ranching overview: breeds of sheep (Merino, Ram-bouillet, Southdown, Suffolk, Shropshire, Hampshire, Cheviot, Oxford, Dorset, Corriedale), shearing sheep wool, cuts of meat... Some music had to be removed from this film due to a copyright content match. Public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound,...

    published: 06 Jul 2016
  • How Montana tribes rely on tradition to fight climate change

    In Western Montana, global warming is obvious. Scientists are studying melting glaciers at Glacier National Park and Native Americans are seeing it firsthand in their homelands. Some tribal leaders there are looking to their ancestral values as they adapt to climate change.

    published: 27 May 2016
  • TNAFA Permaculture & Design Course

    Some pictures from 2008 summer permaculture training hosted by the Traditional Native American Farmers Association.

    published: 12 Oct 2008
  • How to grow Chilli Peppers video with Thompson & Morgan

    Chillies are surprisingly easy to grow, and there's a chilli pepper to suit everybody's tastebuds. Learn how to grow your own chillies with our helpful video guide. Click here to view our full range of chili peppers http://tinyurl.com/dxgrbmt For more information on growing chillies click here http://tinyurl.com/778f7rf

    published: 24 May 2012
  • Sholom Rubashkin: Years after the raid... By Liz Goodwin | The Lookout

    Years after immigration raid, Iowa town feels poorer and less stable http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/lookout/years-immigration-raid-iowa-town-feels-poorer-less-133035414.html Agriprocessors was the corporate identity of a slaughterhouse and meat-packaging factory based in Postville, Iowa, best known as a facility for the glatt kosher processing of cattle, as well as chicken, turkey, duck, and lamb. Agriprocessors' meat and poultry products were marketed under the brand Iowa Best Beef. Two-thirds of its output was non-kosher. Its kosher products were marketed under various labels, including Aaron's Best, Shor Habor, Supreme Kosher and Rubashkins. The firm was founded and owned by Aaron Rubashkin, who purchased the meat-packing facility in 1987, and managed by two of his sons, Sholom ...

    published: 07 Dec 2011
  • How to Grow Papaya - TvAgro By Juan Gonzalo Angel

    Twitter @juangangel The papaya (/pəˈpaɪə/ or US /pəˈpɑːjə/) (from Carib via Spanish), papaw, (/pəˈpɔː/[2]) or pawpaw (/ˈpɔːˌpɔː/[2] is the fruit of the plant Carica papaya, and is one of the 22 accepted species in the genus Carica of the plant family Caricaceae.[3] It is native to the tropics of the Americas, perhaps from southern Mexico and neighbouring Central America.[4] It was first cultivated in Mexico[citation needed] several centuries before the emergence of the Mesoamerican classical civilizations. The papaya is a large, tree-like plant, with a single stem growing from 5 to 10 m (16 to 33 ft) tall, with spirally arranged leaves confined to the top of the trunk. The lower trunk is conspicuously scarred where leaves and fruit were borne. The leaves are large, 50–70 cm (20–28 in) in...

    published: 24 Sep 2015
  • African agri-business? - Know this PROFITABLE and powerful success secret!

    Dr. Harnet shares insights into powerful strategies and products you can use in African agriculture

    published: 28 Jun 2017
  • Built On Agriculture Part 1 - The Selkirk Settlers

    Built on Agriculture” is a 4 part documentary series that pays tribute to the people who settled the plains of Manitoba and what they achieved. Part 1: The Selkirk Settlers Lord Selkirk’s compassion for the Scottish crofters helped seed the Canadian prairies with a population that helped retain the land for Canada. They faced many struggles surviving the early decades and becoming successful farmers. Because of their success the prairies were then settled by waves of immigrant farmers attracted by free land and fueled by the Canadian Government’s support for the railroad. Production funding for Built on Agriculture was provided by Manitoba Government Growing Forward 2, a federal-provincial territorial initiative, Government of Canada; MacDon Industries Ltd., Monsanto Canada Inc., The Bi...

    published: 25 Nov 2015
The Great Laws of Nature: Indigenous Organic Agriculture Documentary

The Great Laws of Nature: Indigenous Organic Agriculture Documentary

  • Order:
  • Duration: 22:23
  • Updated: 20 Dec 2011
  • views: 141920
videos
Let's reconnect with our relatives in nature In 2013: the plant beings: A group of First Nations People in Saskatchewan Canada are reclaiming their Indigenous organic and natural agricultural heritage, reconnecting with Nature, learning and observing her natural laws, and getting back on the road to self-reliance. This video is presented here courtesy of Muskoday Organic Growers Co-op.. If you want to purchase a copy of this video please contact the producers through this link: rivard@rivard.tv
https://wn.com/The_Great_Laws_Of_Nature_Indigenous_Organic_Agriculture_Documentary
Permaculture is like Native American agriculture

Permaculture is like Native American agriculture

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:19
  • Updated: 08 Feb 2011
  • views: 8242
videos
http://www.permies.com Heidi Bohan, author of "The People of Cascadia" talks about the Native American agriculture in the pacific northwest hundreds of years ago. She explains that the native american people that were here then were well beyond "hunter gatherer". They had an agriculture all their own. Much like permaculture. I think that this Native American idea of agriculture is far beyond current agriculture practices. Even beyond organic agriculture practices. The Native Americans used polyculture techniques and focused on plants reproducing themselves. Enhancing natural systems. Heidi mentions that the Native Americans would do burnings to help with production. Including to keep trees out of certain agrculture fields. You can learn more about Heidi and her book at http://www.peopleofcascadia.com music by Jimmy Pardo
https://wn.com/Permaculture_Is_Like_Native_American_Agriculture
Native American Farming (Influenced 75% of the World's Food Supply)

Native American Farming (Influenced 75% of the World's Food Supply)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:15
  • Updated: 25 Feb 2011
  • views: 7300
videos
Native Americans helped the colonists survive in their new environment. They gave the colonists new crops such as squash and maize, and taught them farming methods. Native Americans also taught the colonists a crop rotation system, which helped to preserve soil nutrients. The Native Americans had a wonderful knowledge of the natural materials in the world around them. They were able to teach the settlers about food, medicine and dyes. This information was very important to the colonists and they learned how to become farmers. Another method used by the Native American was a technique in which rows of crops were placed closely to one another. In between the first set of crops another set would be placed. This was an efficient method saving space and making the most out of the land. The tradition of saving space and preparing it for the next generation was important to the Native Americans.
https://wn.com/Native_American_Farming_(Influenced_75_Of_The_World's_Food_Supply)
Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24

Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:44
  • Updated: 09 Aug 2013
  • views: 1363292
videos
In which John Green teaches you about the Wild, Wild, West, which as it turns out, wasn't as wild as it seemed in the movies. When we think of the western expansion of the United States in the 19th century, we're conditioned to imagine the loner. The self-reliant, unattached cowpoke roaming the prairie in search of wandering calves, or the half-addled prospector who has broken from reality thanks to the solitude of his single-minded quest for gold dust. While there may be a grain of truth to these classic Hollywood stereotypes, it isn't a very big grain of truth. Many of the pioneers who settled the west were family groups. Many were immigrants. Many were major corporations. The big losers in the westward migration were Native Americans, who were killed or moved onto reservations. Not cool, American pioneers. Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. America’s Westward expansion was fueled by both Manifest Destiny and a desire to grow the nation and its resources — though at a cost: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/manifest-destiny As Americans continued to stream West on the name of Manifest Destiny, American Indians saw their lives changed forever as they moved from practising resistance to lives on reservations: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/from-resistance-to-reservations
https://wn.com/Westward_Expansion_Crash_Course_US_History_24
Native America before European Colonization

Native America before European Colonization

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:37:51
  • Updated: 08 Apr 2013
  • views: 9400147
videos
Upon the arrival of Columbus in 1492 in the Carabean Islands, unknown to Columbus (and majority of the Eastern Hemisphere), he landed on Islands located in the middle of two huge continents now known has North America and South America that was teaming with huge Civilizations (that rivaled any in the world at that time) and thousands of smaller Nations and Tribes. With recent estimations, the population may have been over 100 million people that spanned from Alaska and Green Land, all the to the tip of southern South America. Pre Colombian North America (north of Mesoamerica): In Pre-Canada, most people lived along the coast, along the major rivers "I'll finishing editing this soon"
https://wn.com/Native_America_Before_European_Colonization
Montana Rancher Feature: Karen Yost on the American Agri-Women

Montana Rancher Feature: Karen Yost on the American Agri-Women

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:28
  • Updated: 17 Jan 2014
  • views: 425
videos
Why do we need to tell the agriculture story? In this video, native Montanan, Karen Yost, shares her perspective on that topic and how one group of women is coming together to be a unified voice for agriculture.
https://wn.com/Montana_Rancher_Feature_Karen_Yost_On_The_American_Agri_Women
Agritourism: Every Field has a Story | Katharine Millonzi | TEDxHudson

Agritourism: Every Field has a Story | Katharine Millonzi | TEDxHudson

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:23
  • Updated: 03 Nov 2014
  • views: 3552
videos
This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Awarded a Fulbright to eat, drink, and study her way through Italy, Millonzi discovers new ways for American Agricultural enterprises to enliven and sustain their unique position in the creative and hospitality economies. An ethno-botanist and gastronome, Katharine Millonzi has worked with agriculturalists and policymakers in Kenya, India, Brazil, the Balkans, and across Europe, exploring the relationship between culture and food. Previously, she directed the Sustainable Food and Agriculture Program at Williams College, was head of staff at the New Economics Institute, and has consulted for a wide range of food-craft enterprises in New England. Millonzi was a 2007 Fulbright Fellow in Italy, where she spent eighteen months researching traditional food production and identity, amassing expertise on farm-based tourism and marketing. Her commitment to regional food systems has led her to the Hudson Valley to co-found FarmShare, an agritourism consultancy business. She is a native of New York City and the Berkshires, and is currently writing a book of stories about Balkan food culture called Fish on Fire. | katharinemillonzi.com, farmshareny.com About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
https://wn.com/Agritourism_Every_Field_Has_A_Story_|_Katharine_Millonzi_|_Tedxhudson
NATIVE FARM

NATIVE FARM

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:16
  • Updated: 20 Aug 2016
  • views: 2175
videos
When your on the phone late at night. SUBSCRIBE for more Videos! Ahehee! Find us on Facebook @tomorrowshere
https://wn.com/Native_Farm
Sheep Ranching: "Sheep" 1954 The Texas Company (Texaco); How Sheep are Raised, Sheared & Cut

Sheep Ranching: "Sheep" 1954 The Texas Company (Texaco); How Sheep are Raised, Sheared & Cut

  • Order:
  • Duration: 24:26
  • Updated: 06 Jul 2016
  • views: 2454
videos
Agriculture: Farming, Ranching playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL897E774CDB19F283 more at http://quickfound.net/links/agriculture_news_and_links.html Sheep ranching overview: breeds of sheep (Merino, Ram-bouillet, Southdown, Suffolk, Shropshire, Hampshire, Cheviot, Oxford, Dorset, Corriedale), shearing sheep wool, cuts of meat... Some music had to be removed from this film due to a copyright content match. Public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranch A ranch is an area of landscape, including various structures, given primarily to the practice of ranching, the practice of raising grazing livestock such as cattle or sheep for meat or wool. The word most often applies to livestock-raising operations in the western United States and Canada, though there are ranches in other areas. People who own or operate a ranch are called ranchers, or stockgrowers. Ranching is also a method used to raise less common livestock such as elk, American bison or even ostrich, emu, and alpacas. Ranches generally consist of large areas, but may be of nearly any size. In the western United States, many ranches are a combination of privately owned land supplemented by grazing leases on land under the control of the federal Bureau of Land Management. If the ranch includes arable or irrigated land, the ranch may also engage in a limited amount of farming, raising crops for feeding the animals, such as hay and feed grains. Ranches that cater exclusively to tourists are called guest ranches or, colloquially, "dude ranches." Most working ranches do not cater to guests, though they may allow private hunters or outfitters onto their property to hunt native wildlife. However, in recent years, a few struggling smaller operations have added some dude ranch features, such as horseback rides, cattle drives or guided hunting, in an attempt to bring in additional income. Ranching is part of the iconography of the "Wild West" as seen in Western movies and rodeos. Ranch occupations The person who owns and manages the operation of a ranch is usually called a rancher, but the terms cattleman, stockgrower, or stockman are also sometimes used... The people who are employees of the rancher and involved in handling livestock are called a number of terms, including cowhand, ranch hand, and cowboy. People exclusively involved with handling horses are sometimes called wranglers. Origins of ranching Ranching and the cowboy tradition originated in Spain, out of the necessity to handle large herds of grazing animals on dry land from horseback. During the Reconquista, members of the Spanish nobility and various military orders received large land grants that the Kingdom of Castile had conquered from the Moors. These landowners were to defend the lands put into their control and could use them for earning revenue. In the process it was found that open-range breeding of sheep and cattle (under the Mesta system) was the most suitable use for vast tracts, particularly in the parts of Spain now known as Castilla-La Mancha, Extremadura and Andalusia... The prairie and desert lands of what today is Mexico and the western United States were well-suited to "open range" grazing... The use of livestock branding allowed the cattle owned by different ranchers to be identified and sorted. Beginning with the settlement of Texas in the 1840s, and expansion both north and west from that time, through the Civil War and into the 1880s, ranching dominated western economic activity. Along with ranchers came the need for agricultural crops to feed both humans and livestock, and hence many farmers also came west along with ranchers. Many operations were "diversified," with both ranching and farming activities taking place. With the Homestead Act of 1862, more settlers came west to set up farms. This created some conflict, as increasing numbers of farmers needed to fence off fields to prevent cattle and sheep from eating their crops. Barbed wire, invented in 1874, gradually made inroads in fencing off privately owned land, especially for homesteads. There was some reduction of land on the Great Plains open to grazing...
https://wn.com/Sheep_Ranching_Sheep_1954_The_Texas_Company_(Texaco)_How_Sheep_Are_Raised,_Sheared_Cut
How Montana tribes rely on tradition to fight climate change

How Montana tribes rely on tradition to fight climate change

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:28
  • Updated: 27 May 2016
  • views: 436
videos
In Western Montana, global warming is obvious. Scientists are studying melting glaciers at Glacier National Park and Native Americans are seeing it firsthand in their homelands. Some tribal leaders there are looking to their ancestral values as they adapt to climate change.
https://wn.com/How_Montana_Tribes_Rely_On_Tradition_To_Fight_Climate_Change
TNAFA Permaculture & Design Course

TNAFA Permaculture & Design Course

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:50
  • Updated: 12 Oct 2008
  • views: 625
videos
Some pictures from 2008 summer permaculture training hosted by the Traditional Native American Farmers Association.
https://wn.com/Tnafa_Permaculture_Design_Course
How to grow Chilli Peppers video with Thompson & Morgan

How to grow Chilli Peppers video with Thompson & Morgan

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:19
  • Updated: 24 May 2012
  • views: 540633
videos
Chillies are surprisingly easy to grow, and there's a chilli pepper to suit everybody's tastebuds. Learn how to grow your own chillies with our helpful video guide. Click here to view our full range of chili peppers http://tinyurl.com/dxgrbmt For more information on growing chillies click here http://tinyurl.com/778f7rf
https://wn.com/How_To_Grow_Chilli_Peppers_Video_With_Thompson_Morgan
Sholom Rubashkin: Years after the raid... By Liz Goodwin | The Lookout

Sholom Rubashkin: Years after the raid... By Liz Goodwin | The Lookout

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:50
  • Updated: 07 Dec 2011
  • views: 1786
videos
Years after immigration raid, Iowa town feels poorer and less stable http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/lookout/years-immigration-raid-iowa-town-feels-poorer-less-133035414.html Agriprocessors was the corporate identity of a slaughterhouse and meat-packaging factory based in Postville, Iowa, best known as a facility for the glatt kosher processing of cattle, as well as chicken, turkey, duck, and lamb. Agriprocessors' meat and poultry products were marketed under the brand Iowa Best Beef. Two-thirds of its output was non-kosher. Its kosher products were marketed under various labels, including Aaron's Best, Shor Habor, Supreme Kosher and Rubashkins. The firm was founded and owned by Aaron Rubashkin, who purchased the meat-packing facility in 1987, and managed by two of his sons, Sholom Rubashkin and Heshy Rubashkin. Eventually it became the largest kosher meat-packing plant in the United States. Agriprocessors faced accusations of mistreatment of cattle, pollution, and a series of alleged violations of labor law. In May 2008, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) staged a raid of the plant, and arrested nearly 400 illegal immigrant workers. Agriprocessors plants stopped operating in October 2008, and the firm filed for bankruptcy on November 5 of the same year. Sholom Rubashkin as the highest ranking day-to-day corporate officer was charged with federal financial fraud and sentenced to 27 years in prison in June 2010. The Agriprocessors plant was bought at auction in July 2009 by SHF Industries and has resumed production under the new name Agri Star. In the 1980s Aaron Rubashkin, a Lubavitcher Hasidic butcher from Brooklyn, decided to take advantage of economic structural changes to bring mass-production to the kosher meat production business. In 1987 he bought an abandoned slaughterhouse outside Postville, a town undergoing a major employment crisis in northeastern Iowa and opened a processing plant creating some 350 jobs. Two of his sons were put in charge, Sholom Rubashkin, the second youngest as CEO, and Heshy Rubashkin, the youngest, as vice president of marketing and sales. In 1992, Agriprocessors added poultry to its offerings. At its peak the plant employed over 800 people, killing more than 500 head of cattle each day in kosher production. The sales, according to numbers given to Cattle Buyers Weekly, rose from $80 million in 1997 to $180 million in 2002 and may have reached $250 million or more. Rubashkin brought modern industrial methods to what has historically been a small, almost boutique craft, developing retail-ready glatt kosher products being sold both in supermarkets and in small, local grocery stores and meat markets around the United States. Agriprocessors was the largest (glatt) kosher meat producer in the United States and the only one authorized by Israel's Orthodox rabbinate to export beef to Israel. In the 20 years it operated in Postville, Agriprocessors had a major impact on the town, creating new jobs, attracting immigrants from many different countries, and bringing an influx of ultra religious Jews to a part of the United States where Jews had been practically unknown. The Rubashkin family opened another processing plant for bison, cattle and lamb called Local Pride Plant in conjunction with the Oglala Lakota native-American tribe of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in Gordon, Nebraska in 2006 employing some 100 locals. The presence of the plant near an Indian reservation provided considerable tax breaks for Rubashkin. Governor Dave Heineman presented a $505,000 gratuity check to Rubashkin on behalf of the city of Gordon, as part of an incentive package that brought the factory to the town. Agriprocessors had two distribution sites, one in Brooklyn, New York, and one in Miami, Florida, both managed by members of the Rubashkin family. It also operated slaughter facilities in South America. *** Prayer and Torah study groups will continue to be held around the world in the merit of Sholom Mordechai Rubashkin and his family.
https://wn.com/Sholom_Rubashkin_Years_After_The_Raid..._By_Liz_Goodwin_|_The_Lookout
How to Grow Papaya - TvAgro By Juan Gonzalo Angel

How to Grow Papaya - TvAgro By Juan Gonzalo Angel

  • Order:
  • Duration: 22:50
  • Updated: 24 Sep 2015
  • views: 730832
videos
Twitter @juangangel The papaya (/pəˈpaɪə/ or US /pəˈpɑːjə/) (from Carib via Spanish), papaw, (/pəˈpɔː/[2]) or pawpaw (/ˈpɔːˌpɔː/[2] is the fruit of the plant Carica papaya, and is one of the 22 accepted species in the genus Carica of the plant family Caricaceae.[3] It is native to the tropics of the Americas, perhaps from southern Mexico and neighbouring Central America.[4] It was first cultivated in Mexico[citation needed] several centuries before the emergence of the Mesoamerican classical civilizations. The papaya is a large, tree-like plant, with a single stem growing from 5 to 10 m (16 to 33 ft) tall, with spirally arranged leaves confined to the top of the trunk. The lower trunk is conspicuously scarred where leaves and fruit were borne. The leaves are large, 50–70 cm (20–28 in) in diameter, deeply palmately lobed, with seven lobes. Unusually for such large plants, the trees are dioecious. The tree is usually unbranched, unless lopped. The flowers are similar in shape to the flowers of the Plumeria, but are much smaller and wax-like. They appear on the axils of the leaves, maturing into large fruit - 15–45 cm (5.9–17.7 in) long and 10–30 cm (3.9–11.8 in) in diameter. The fruit is a type of berry.[5] It is ripe when it feels soft (as soft as a ripe avocado or a bit softer) and its skin has attained an amber to orange hue. Carica papaya was the first transgenic fruit tree to have its genome deciphered apaya plants grow in three sexes: male, female, and hermaphrodite. The male produces only pollen, never fruit. The female will produce small, inedible fruits unless pollinated. The hermaphrodite can self-pollinate since its flowers contain both male stamens and female ovaries. Almost all commercial papaya orchards contain only hermaphrodites.[7] Originally from southern Mexico (particularly Chiapas and Veracruz), Central America, and northern South America,[4] the papaya is now cultivated in most tropical countries. In cultivation, it grows rapidly, fruiting within three years. It is, however, highly frost-sensitive, limiting its production to tropical climates. Temperatures below −2 °C (29 °F) are greatly harmful if not fatal. In Florida and California, growth is generally limited to southern parts of the states. In California, it's generally limited to private gardens in Los Angeles, Orange, and San Diego Counties. It also prefers sandy, well-drained soil, as standing water will kill the plant within 24 hours.[8] For cultivation, however, only female plants are used, since they give off a single flower each time, and close to the base of the plant, while the male gives off multiple flowers in long stems, which result in poorer quality fruit.[4] Top producers of papayas, 2013 Country/State Production in millions of tons India 5.5 Brazil 1.6 Indonesia 0.9 Nigeria 0.8 Mexico 0.8 World 12.4 Source: United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization, FAOSTAT [9] India and Brazil are the major producers of papaya, together providing 57% of the world total of 12.4 million tons in 2013 (FAOSTAT chart). Gaining in popularity among tropical fruits worldwide, papaya is now ranked fourth in total tropical fruit production after bananas, oranges, and mango. Global papaya production has grown significantly over the last few years, mainly as a result of increased production in India.[10] Papaya has become an important agricultural export for developing countries, where export revenues of the fruit provide a livelihood for thousands of people, especially in Asia and Latin America. More info at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papaya Juan Gonzalo Angel www.tvagro.tv
https://wn.com/How_To_Grow_Papaya_Tvagro_By_Juan_Gonzalo_Angel
African agri-business? - Know this PROFITABLE and powerful success secret!

African agri-business? - Know this PROFITABLE and powerful success secret!

  • Order:
  • Duration: 22:26
  • Updated: 28 Jun 2017
  • views: 1295
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Dr. Harnet shares insights into powerful strategies and products you can use in African agriculture
https://wn.com/African_Agri_Business_Know_This_Profitable_And_Powerful_Success_Secret
Built On Agriculture Part 1 - The Selkirk Settlers

Built On Agriculture Part 1 - The Selkirk Settlers

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  • Duration: 26:47
  • Updated: 25 Nov 2015
  • views: 5735
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Built on Agriculture” is a 4 part documentary series that pays tribute to the people who settled the plains of Manitoba and what they achieved. Part 1: The Selkirk Settlers Lord Selkirk’s compassion for the Scottish crofters helped seed the Canadian prairies with a population that helped retain the land for Canada. They faced many struggles surviving the early decades and becoming successful farmers. Because of their success the prairies were then settled by waves of immigrant farmers attracted by free land and fueled by the Canadian Government’s support for the railroad. Production funding for Built on Agriculture was provided by Manitoba Government Growing Forward 2, a federal-provincial territorial initiative, Government of Canada; MacDon Industries Ltd., Monsanto Canada Inc., The Bicentenary of the Red River Selkirk Settlement Committee, Parrish & Heimbecker Limited, Richardson Foundation, The Winnipeg Foundation, and the Members of Prairie Public.
https://wn.com/Built_On_Agriculture_Part_1_The_Selkirk_Settlers
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